The 6th Annual Conference on Bank Structure & Competition

Since the early 1960s, the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Conference on Bank Structure and Competition has served as a forum for academics, regulators and industry participants to debate current issues affecting the financial services industry. Each year the purpose of the conference is to continue that tradition. This retrospective on the history and evolution of the conference reviews the past four decades of conferences.

 

The primary motivating factor for the conference was the passage of the 1960 Bank Merger Act and the U.S. versus Philadelphia National Bank Supreme Court decision. Suddenly, bank regulatory agencies were required to consider competitive factors in addition to banking factors when evaluating bank merger applications. Each of the Federal Reserve Banks was encouraged to survey the existing literature on bank structure and develop its own research agendas on these issues.


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05/19/69
12:00 AM
I. Selected Topics
A Survey of Judicial and Regulatory Opinions Affecting Banking Competition under the Bank Merger Acts of 1960 and 1966
, Roosevelt University
A Conceptual Optimal Banking Structure for the United States
Larry Mote, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Almarin Phillips, University of Pennsylvania
Discussant
12:00 AM
II. Bank Holding Companies and Conglomerates
Gerald Fischer, Temple University
Market Extension by Bank Holding Companies: History, Economic Implications and Current Issues
George Hall, Rand Corporation
Some Impacts of One-Bank Holding Companies
Martin Bronfenbrenner, Carnegie-Mellon University
The Japanese Experience
Discussants
Donald Hodgman, University of Illinois
George G Kaufman, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Leonard Lapidus, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
George Mitchell, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
What We Can Do about Bank Structure
An Antitrust Look at the One-Bank Holding Company Problem
Donald Baker, U.S. Department of Justice
Holding Company Legislation in the Eastern States
Ralph Gelder, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Holding Company Legislation in the Midwestern States
Richard Pettway, Michigan State University
12:00 AM
III. Research in Progress
Research at the American Bankers Association
Thomas R Atkinson, American Bankers Association
Douglas V Austin, Western Michigan University
Limitations to Potential Competition—A Counter-Theology
Eugene F Brigham, University of Wisconsin
Holding Companies in the Savings and Loan Industry
David Fritz, Savings Banks Association of New York State
Interest Rates and Deposit Flows
Paul M Horvitz, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Research at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
George G Kaufman, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Benjamin J Klebaner, City College of New York
The 1966 Amendments to the Bank Holding Company Act
Leonard Lapidus, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Conglomerates and Economic and Political Pluralism: A Summary
Samuel M Loescher, Indiana University
Impact of Market Structure on the Pricing and Composition of Bank Services in the Eleventh Federal Reserve District
Peter S Rose, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Charles D Salley, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Research at the Board of Governors
David L Smith, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
Geographic Aspects of Banking Markets
J Fred Weston, University of California, Los Angeles

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A Brief History of the Conference


Since the early 1960s the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Conference on Bank Structure and Competition has served as a forum for academics, regulators and industry participants to debate current issues affecting the financial services industry. Each year the purpose of the conference is to continue that tradition. This retrospective on the history and evolution of the conference reviews the past four decades of conferences.


Back To Top