The 14th Annual Conference on Bank Structure & Competition

Since the early 1960s, the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Conference on Bank Structure and Competition has served as a forum for academics, regulators and industry participants to debate current issues affecting the financial services industry. Each year the purpose of the conference is to continue that tradition. This retrospective on the history and evolution of the conference reviews the past four decades of conferences.

 

The primary motivating factor for the conference was the passage of the 1960 Bank Merger Act and the U.S. versus Philadelphia National Bank Supreme Court decision. Suddenly, bank regulatory agencies were required to consider competitive factors in addition to banking factors when evaluating bank merger applications. Each of the Federal Reserve Banks was encouraged to survey the existing literature on bank structure and develop its own research agendas on these issues.


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05/14/81
12:00 AM
I. Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act: Implications for the Future
DIDMCA, Depository Institution Failure Probability and the Demand for Supervisory Resources
Robert H Dugger, National Credit Union Administration
Randall J Miller, National Credit Union Administration
John Wolken, National Credit Union Administration
Coping with Deregulation: DIDMCA and the S&Ls
Roger Lister, Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco
The Impacts of DIDMCA on Federal Credit Unions
Harold Black, National Credit Union Administration
Robert Schweitzer, University of Delaware
The Outlook for Federal Reserve Supervisory and Regulatory Policymaking
Harvey Rosenblum, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
George G Kaufman, Loyola University of Chicago and Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Forecasting the Effects of Policies Instigated by DIDMCA
E P Shea, Northeastern University
C F Baum, Boston College
12:00 AM
II. International Banking
Some Evidence of Transnational Banking Structure
Neal M Soss, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City
Diane Page, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency
Diversifiable versus Non-Diversiable Risk in LDC Lending
Laurie S Goodman, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Economic versus Regulatory Influence on Foreign Bank Penetration: A Test for Canada and the United States
James W Dean, Simon Fraser University
Ian H Giddy, Columbia University
Barriers to U.S. Bank Entry to Foreign Countries: An Assessment of Their Impact
Neil B Murphy, University of Oklahoma
12:00 AM
III. Interstate Banking
An Overview of Interstate Banking
Larry A Frieder
Interstate Banking from a Regional Viewpoint
Guy W Botts, Barnett Banks of Florida, Inc.
Interstate Banking: Federal Perspectives and Prospects
Robert A Eisenbeis, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Interstate Banking Consistent with McFadden–Douglas
Lawrence E Kreider, Conference of State Bank Supervisors
Interstate Banking: Issues for the Eighties
Barry F Sullivan, First National Bank of Chicago
12:00 AM
IV. DIDMCA: Impact on the Mortgage Markets
DIDMCA: The Impact on the Mortgage Markets
George G Kaufman, Loyola University of Chicago and Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
The Impact of Banking Deregulation on the Mortgage Markets
Richard C Aspinwall, Chase Manhattan Bank
Deregulation of the Mortgage Market
Thomas Harter, Mortgage Bankers Association of America
DIDMCA: Impact on the Housing Market
John C Weicher, Urban Institute
12:00 AM
V. Correspondent Financial Services: New Trends in Pricing and Product Development
New Trends in Pricing and Product Development of Correspondent Financial Services
Alan K Reichert, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Correspondent Financial Services: New Trends in Pricing and Product Development
Garland K Carver, Iowa-Des Moines National Bank
The Role of the Federal Reserve in the Provision of Correspondent Financial Services
Alan K Reichert, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Correspondent Financial Services—The Federal Home Loan Bank System Reacts to Title III Consumer Checking Account Equity Act of 1980
Ronald R Morphew, Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis
Credit Unions and Correspondent Services
Robert Von Der Ohe, Credit Union National Association
Correspondent Financial Services: The Consumer Viewpoint
Elinor H Solomon, U.S. Department of Justice
12:00 AM
VI. The Regulation of Financial Futures
An Introduction to Interest Rates Futures Markets
Paul L Kasriel, University of Minnesota
Reflections on the Use of Financial Futures by Commercial Banks: Key Regulatory Issues
Franklin R Edwards, Columbia Business School
Commercial Bank Use of Financial Futures: Prospects and Implications
Kenneth Garbade, New York University
Comments on Bank Use of the Financial Futures Markets
William H Kesler, Northern Trust Company
12:00 AM
VII. Research in Progress
Bond Price Movements and Portfolio Strategies in Complete and Incomplete Markets
G O Bierwag, University of Oregon
Nonprice Competition in Banking—Some Evidence from the NOW Account Experience
Evelyn F Carroll, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Correspondent Services and Cost Economies in Commercial Banking
Mark J Flannery, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
Research in Progress at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
B Frank King, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
ors Affecting Borrowings from Foreign Banks: A Cross-Country Comparison
Neil Pinsky, University of Wisconsin
Donald Flinn, University of Wisconsin
A Survey Study of Bank Services, Prices and Management Practices
Peter S Rose, Texas A&M University
James W Kolari, Texas A&M University
Commercial Bank Behavior, Operating Targets and Lagged Reserve Accounting
Vefa Tarhan, Loyola University of Chicago
The Impact of Expanding the Market for Bank Stocks on Bank Capital to Asset Ratios
Steven R Weisbrod, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

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A Brief History of the Conference


Since the early 1960s the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Conference on Bank Structure and Competition has served as a forum for academics, regulators and industry participants to debate current issues affecting the financial services industry. Each year the purpose of the conference is to continue that tradition. This retrospective on the history and evolution of the conference reviews the past four decades of conferences.


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